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101 Must-Know Transition Phrases for Engaging Presentations Online

 

Giving presentations is often feared by many professionals, but if the presentation is online and you're not a native speaker, things get even trickier. One tip to make things easier? Learn useful phrases to help you navigate your presentation. Once you have those, listen to our podcast below, check out these 21 Helpful Tips For Remarkable and Outstanding Presentations, and you're ready to go!

General vocabulary for presentations

  • To outline
  • To clarify
  • To highlight
  • To emphasize
  • To walk you through
  • To send around
  • To carry on
  • To get carried away
  • To sum up
  • To focus on

Learning new English words is not easy, but you can achieve effective communication through practice and repetition. If you are a Talaera student, visit the Library to practice your vocabulary for presentations. If are not part of the Talaera community yet, learn how we can help you here.

Welcome your audience

  • Good morning/afternoon/evening everyone. Thank you for joining us today, and welcome to today's webinar.
  • Hello everyone, I’m very happy to be speaking with you today.

Have you read these 6 Tricks The Best Public Speakers Use To Captivate Their Audience?

Introduce yourself

  • My name is Susan, and I’m part of the design team here at Globex Corporation.
  • First of all, a little bit about my background - I am the Team Lead at [Company], and I've been in charge of [your main responsibility] for [X] years.
  • I'd like to tell you a bit about myself - my name is Eve I'm the Operations Manager here at [Company].

Introduce the topic and goal of the presentation

  • Today, I'd like to talk about…
  • This presentation will take about [X] minutes, and we will discuss...
  • We've allocated [X] minutes to this presentation. and I'll talk about...
  • I'd like to give you a brief breakdown of...
  • I'd like to take this opportunity to talk about...
  • The main goal of this presentation is…
  • The purpose of this presentation is...
  • My objective today is...

Questions from the audience

  • If you have any questions about anything, feel free to interrupt.
  • If anything isn't clear, please click on the 'raise hand' button and I'll do my best to answer your question.
  • I'd be happy to answer your questions at the end of the presentation.
  • If you have any questions, please kindly wait until the end to ask them. We will have [X] minutes for a Q&A session at the end.
  • Since today's audience is considerably large, we will not have time for questions, but please email me at email@address.com

Clear out technical issues

  • Can everyone hear me well? Let me know if you encounter any technical difficulties throughout the presentation.
  • If you are not speaking, please put yourselves on mute.
  • If you feel that the sound quality is poor throughout the presentation, please let me know.

Transition to the main topic

  • Hi everyone, I think we might still be missing a few people but I’m going to kick things off now so we have time to get through everything.
  • All right, let’s dive right in!
  • All right, let’s jump right in!
  • Let’s get started.
  • Let’s kick things off.
  • I’m going to talk about
  • The purpose/subject of this presentation is
  • I’ve divided the presentation into 3 parts: In the first part, ... / Then in the second part, ... / Finally, I’ll go on to talk about...
  • Let me begin by looking at...
  • Let me start with some general information on...

Main body of your presentation

  • Now let’s move to the first part of the presentation,
  • So, first
  • We can see 4 advantages and two disadvantages. First,
  • On the one hand… On the other hand…
  • There are two steps involved. The first step is… The second step is…
  • There are four stages to the project.

Request more info about our English training

Transition to a new section

  • All right, let’s turn to
  • Now we come to the next point, which is
  • Okay so that’s [topic 1], but what about [topic 2]?
  • There’s a lot more to talk about, but since we’re pushed for time, let’s move on to [topic 2].
  • This leads me to my next point, which is...

Give examples and details

  • For example...
  • A good example of this is...
  • To illustrate this point...
  • This reminds me of...
  • To give you an example...
  • Let me elaborate further on...

Describe visual aids

  • As you can see [from this infographic]
  • This chart shows
  • If you look at this graph, you will see
  • From this chart, we can understand how
  • Let me show you this [image, graph, diagram]
  • On the right/left
  • In the middle of
  • At the top/bottom of the picture

Emphasize an idea

  • This is important because
  • I’d like to emphasize that
  • We have to remember that

Repeat the same message with different words

  • In other words
  • To put it more simply
  • So, what I’m saying is that
  • Let me say that again.

It's easy to get stuck in the middle of a presentation, especially if English is not your mother tongue. Here are +20 Top Tips You Need To Know if you're learning business English.

Finish and summarize

  • That’s all I want to say for now about [topic].
  • To sum up, ...
  • This sums up [topic].
  • So in a nutshell, ...
  • So to recap, ...
  • In brief, ...
  • To conclude, ...
  • I’d like to conclude by emphasizing the main points...
  • That's it on [topic] for today. In short, we've covered...
  • So, now I’d be very interested to hear your comments.
  • And this brings us to the end of this presentation. I hope [topic] is a little clear after today.
  • So to draw all that together, ...

Start and navigate the Q&A session

  • Thank you for your attention. I hope you found this presentation useful, and I'd be happy to answer any questions.
  • Thank you for listening. We now have [X] minutes left. Do you have any questions?
  • Thank you for your question, [Name].
  • I'm glad you asked.
  • That's an interesting question.
  • That's a great question, I must say. I'm not 100% sure, but off the top of my head, I can tell you that...
  • Are you asking about [topic 1] or [topic 2]?
  • Can you please clarify what exactly you mean by [question]? I'm not sure I fully understand.
  • I'm afraid I don't have the exact figures at hand, but if you give me your email address at the end, I can follow up with you later.
  • Does that answer your question?
  • I hope that makes sense. Is that the kind of answer you were looking for?

Talaera Talks - Transcript Episode 5

Intro
Welcome to Talaera Talks, the business English communication podcast for non-native professionals. My name is Paola and I am co-hosting this show with Simon. In this podcast, we're going to be covering communication advice and tips to help express yourself with confidence in English in professional settings. So we hope you enjoy the show!


Okay, welcome back for our third episode of Talaera Talks. This is Simon, and I'm joined with Paola. Paola, how are you doing?

0:37
Hi, Simon. I'm great. Happy to do another episode.

0:41
Yeah, absolutely. And Happy Friday.

0:44
Happy Friday!

0:49
So today, our topic: Presenting in English. I'd like to start this episode with a quote I found on Harvard Business Review that I thought was really interesting. It says, "Even native English speakers often anticipate disaster when making presentations. By but for non-native speakers, the anticipatory and situational anxiety associated with their unique challenges (these challenges - being understandable, choosing the right words, speaking spontaneously), can be overwhelming. Moreover, if these concerns interfere with your willingness or ability to make business presentations, the impact can be career-limiting." So yeah, that's a pretty kind of heavy quote to start. But it is something that we see from a lot of our clients, right?

1:52
Yeah, it's super interesting. It was super interesting to read. It's something we know, but it's important to remind it that it is presentations, the topic we have today is something that is not pleasurable for anyone, not for non-native speakers, but also for native speakers. So that's something to point out. And today, we talked about that... We said that we wanted to start with those challenges or fears that we see from our clients, our learners.

2:25
Yeah, and it's usually around the same things, you know, we, at least for me, I come into contact with so many of these, so many of our students who are so competent in their, in their daily lives, what they're doing in their professional lives. And they come to me with these with these fears, like this just general lack of confidence, or imposter syndrome, right? This I don't know if I really deserve to be speaking and, you know, kind of explaining this concept to all these people.

3:05
Mm-hmm. Yes. And also the fear of not being understood, well, they know what I'm saying, well, they understand my accent. There's a lot of worries and concern around accent and our pronunciation expert, Lisa hosted a webinar, actually last week, where she explained that accent matters. But as long as people understand you, it's fine. You don't need to be perfect. Everyone has an accent. So that's also totally fine.

3:37
And this being Yeah, this being one of I think, at least for me, in my experience, one of the most frequently asked for aspects from students. So you know, and just to like, again, just say that this is a challenge for everyone, not just, you know, non-native English speakers. You know, I think all of us have a tough experience or somebody that we think of when we think about public speaking, it's, it's like this, yeah, really anxiety-riddled thing. I mean, I don't have any, you know, funny personal stories, but uh, do you, Paola?

4:20
You want me to tell my embarrassing story, don't you?

4:22
Please, you must.

4:25
So I used to teach at a university in Vietnam when I lived there, and the classes where it rains, you know, from perhaps 50 students to up to what 300 there's was a class with, you know, 2-300 students and there was a little stage it wasn't too high, but there was a little stage and I fell off.

4:46
You fell off the stage. This was during or after the presentation, or...?

4:56
It was around the beginning of the presentation. So...

5:01
During! Oh, I thought it was it was like after like you were walking off?

5:06
No, I move a lot. I use my body language quite a lot. And that was one of the moments where I overdid it, probably, and fell off.

5:17
Wow. Well, I'm glad that you're still here with us.

5:21
Yeah, you know, but that's the story that I sometimes not always tell it. But I sometimes tell it when my students say, Oh, I'm nervous, and I assume that it can happen, you know, I thought it was going to be a disaster. And then I actually ended up making friends with the students that turned out okay.

5:39
Right. Well, yeah, I mean, today, we're not necessarily going to go into the physical dimensions of how to avoid falling off the stage. But we do have some, some good tips, right?

5:54
Yes. And to provide some advice on how to deliver presentations, and lose that fear, we've divided it into three main blocks. And those are what to do before the presentation, tips for during the presentation. And then even after there's things you can do to, to get better.

6:18
Right, let's start with the first, right, what can we do before the presentation in terms of getting ready, preparing?

6:30
So preparing, it's a very general term, but one of the tips that we like to give is, think of the WHAT, WHY and NEXT. So WHAT is your presentation about? WHY should they listen to you and not look it up online (or listen to a podcast, like ours)? And in what NEXT means - what is supposed to happen next? Do they need to do anything, go on a website, send you feedback? Are you going to send them the materials? So what why our next is so straightforward and simple. But when I asked this question to our clients that are so thrown off, and they don't know what to answer sometimes,

7:10
Yeah, I think that's one of those things. And I struggle with this all the time is, when I get an idea or something like that. It's so easy to just jump over those most basic things of, you know, what, why and index, those are so, so basic, but it's such it's, they're so foundational, right? And in terms of creating something that people will understand and be able to, to really attach to.

7:41
Yep. And do you have any tips around how much you should learn? Should you write the whole thing? Or should you memorize?

7:52
Yeah, that, you know, this is a good question as well, that a lot of our learners ask in terms of, yeah, you know, I'm just going to go and write it all out. And then I'll have an idea. And I'll feel better because I can write it and change it so that it sounds more professional. It sounds like I know what I'm talking about. And I always tell people, please don't try to prepare a presentation where you're reading a script, it is just the most unnatural thing ever. And, and it, you won't end up sounding more professional, if anything, your audience is going to detach, because they're going to sense that something's not really right here, it doesn't seem genuine, right doesn't seem real, it just seems like this person is doing what he's doing, which is reading off of a script. And even still a lot of times with a lot of our learners where they know that, okay, I know this material. But I'm going to put all of my effort into making this perfect slide this perfect presentation. So I would say, focus on actually knowing the material itself really well. More than focusing on how the presentation looks, you know, these kinds of things. Because once you're in that situation where you're on the stage, and people are looking at you, at least you'll be able to Windows like kind of red Sirens of you know, panic and anxiety show up. You'll have learned the material itself so well that you can roll with that.

9:29
Yes. And you also have room for improvisation because your brain is so used to the content and you know, so well what you want to say that that's when your brain starts to come up with anecdotes and that's the fun thing that gets you hooked. And that's the main Why should people listen to you instead of reading an article online?

9:49
Exactly. Because for most of our students, you know what you're talking about. That's why you're up there. That's why you have the opportunities to speak there is because someone thinks you're qualified enough to speak to all these people. So trust in that and go with that. So yeah, so we have right not, not over learning. Don't script it right? What else can we do?

10:14
Practice, practice, practice, practice, practice in your mind, but more importantly verbalize it, say it out loud. And recording yourself is uncomfortable for everyone. But it works. I have never tried it. I always told my students should record yourself, you should record yourself and they were like, Huh. And just a few of them did it. And when we started with the webinars, I haven't done something like it before. And I said, Okay, I'll use my own tip. And it was one I'm comfortable. And two, super helpful. So if you get to go over the sound of your own voice, I would say do it.

10:54
Yeah. You know, this is one thing that I have to be totally honest here. Doing these podcasts is the first time I've actually recorded myself for a long time. And I've learned a lot about, you know, not saying the word Absolutely. 500 times, yeah, within the span of 20 minutes. So those are good learning lessons. Definitely. Okay, and then so we have that. And then the last little tip is, I would say get an English mindset before 30 minutes to an hour before the presentation. And that could be listening to a podcast, you know, like Talaera Talks, or, you know, watching a show on Netflix that's, that's in English, whatever you can do to get your kind of English mind, you know, in the zone before you go up and actually speak English. So So those are all of our kind of pre presentation tips, what you can do before, so what about during,

11:58
so for during, there's a lot of things that you can you can do to improve your presentations. But the first tip is to learn how to start to have a mind map of what am I going to do at the beginning. So you start confident already. So welcome, everyone, introduce the people introduce the topic and go to the main point, those four parts will help you have a nice start. Welcome, everyone. For example. Hi, everyone. Welcome to today's presentation. Today, we'll be talking about business events, introduce the people, you can introduce yourself, like, Hi, my name is Paula and I'm a business English instructor at Telstra, and perhaps even the audience. Today we have with us students from all different nationalities and levels, or, you know, whatever the audiences, that's also helpful for everyone to understand, introduce the topic, or give you some best practices for business emails, and a few templates, and then go to the main point. So a simple sentence like Alright, let's get down to business. So having those welcome introducing people introducing the topic and going to the main point will help you have a nice start.

13:16
Yeah, and I like that concept of that the mind map is so good. Because it's it's not the scripting, like we were talking about before, it's having a kind of a little mental checklist. So that when those first few minutes, were you're up there on the on stage, and you're like, oh god, oh, god, here we go. Here we go. You have that little checklist that I created. Okay, so I welcomed introduced the people the topic, and now to the main point, and that can get you in the zone and going I really liked that. Yeah, so so having that, that starting template. And then another thing would be, I would say slowing down, slowing it down. And this is really I think it touches on a lot of aspects. The first would be just the general anxiety, we tend to speak a lot faster when we're really anxious, you know, but by slowing down, it really helps with non native English speakers because it helps with the accent. And it helps with giving you some time to really think through your next thoughts. Now, I'm not saying that you should, while you're speaking, try to think steps three, four or five ahead of you. But giving yourself a little bit of time to Okay, I'm going through this pattern now. Now I can go to the next one, right. And doing that, you know, another with the slowing down a tip if you're really nervous to go in is prefacing your speech. So before you really get into everything, maybe after the welcome part is just to say, Hey, you know, I'm going to try to speak as clearly as possible, as English as myself. first language and really smile and maybe make a little joke about that. And I think that's a good way to open it out for the audience to show some vulnerability and and help. I mean, what do you think about that?

15:13
Yeah, I mean, we see that with, sometimes with celebrities, when they're not native speakers, and they admitted, and they, they kind of put yourself put themselves, as you said, in that vulnerable position, and that makes them even cuter.

15:28
Mm hmm.

15:29
So it's making yourself human, I think it's always a good tip. And you were saying that slowing down helps with your accent and also for yourself to gain time to really know what you're going to say. But also for the for the audience. We don't mind people making some little pulses, so that they also have time to collect their thoughts.

15:50
Right, right. Yeah. Yeah, definitely. Those are, those are two really good aspects, starting, you know, the template and then slowing down, right. Yeah, kind of diffusing the anxiety by saying, Hey, you know, this isn't my first language. And that really gets the audience on your side, right. And then another would be not reading off of your slides. I mean, this is kind of the basic, you know, what you learn in school, but it's also something that a lot of people get, yeah, get, get hooked on, just because it's like a safety net. And I would say that's where the overlearning the material that we talked about beforehand comes into play. Anything else in this?

16:42
Oh, recap for sure. After every section, do a little recap, and at the end to recap where you summarize the main points of the whole presentation?

16:54
Yeah, yeah. Good. Good. So So summarize. Yeah, yeah. And that's a that's a good, you know, I would say three aspects, four aspects that during the presentation, if you keep these in, in your mind, it's, it's, I would say, it's going to help a lot. And so now we're going to move to what can we do after the presentation? We've done it, we've walked off the stage. Whoo, I'm so glad that's over. Now, is all of our work done? No.

17:27
No, not really. That's now it's your chance to actually learn from, from everything you did. So one of the tips we suggest is try to ask for feedback. But that's not so easy, right, Simon?

17:42
Yeah, it's, I think, a big question. And that is, who do you get the feedback from? Right?

Request more info about our English training17:50
So we, we would always suggest to try and find someone you can trust someone who is honest, and who can give you objective feedback. So in some cases, that can be your manager, but sometimes it's a colleague that understands the topic, and can really provide some feedback on how you did.

18:13
Yeah. And that's, I think, in terms of learning, this is one of the most crucial thing is reflecting back on what you did, and seeing what worked, what didn't work, and how can I take that and move forward? Because especially with presenting, it's a skill, and it takes practice, practice, practice. And, and I think, for a lot of people, you should jump at the chance to do this. So that you can continue to learn and continue to grow. But be sure to reflect by Yeah, by asking for feedback and seeing what worked,

18:47
for sure. And ideally, that would be someone, perhaps from work that can see how you did and like the actual show, if not Talaera teachers also do that. So you can present your own presentation, pretending it's the actual one. And that's how we can provide feedback on the structure, the vocabulary, the language in general.

19:08
Yeah, absolutely. I do that. Oh, there you go. Absolutely. Definitely. See, I'm reflecting back and learning as we go. I'm working. I'm learning that. Yeah. But I've done that recently with a couple of students where we've gone through their deck and looked at what are their plans in terms of presenting and we've kind of gone through in detail that together. So So yeah, so that was kind of I would say the biggest thing in terms of afterward.

19:40
So we have the pre-presentation, just as a quick recap for the pre-presentation and before your presentation, always remember the what why next, what is your presentation about? Why should people listen to you and what should happen next overnight Learn the content. be super confident about what you want to talk about. But don't script it. Don't write everything down. Otherwise, it would sound like you're just reading.

20:11
Write and practice through verbalization. record yourself, even though it may be awkward, but it's a great learning technique. And then get in that English mindset beforehand by Yeah, listening to a podcast or what have you. And then during the presentation, right, starting with the template, Paolo was discussing the welcome introducing the people the topic, and then going to the main point,

20:37
slowing down a little bit. It's not necessary to go super fast. It's not only not necessary, but people will understand you better if you take your time and make some pauses. Of course, don't read off their slides. Tell them the story.

20:54
Right, right. And remember

20:56
to recap, just like we're doing now. Send them or tell them a quick summary and the main points,

21:03
right, and don't fall off the stage as well. That's ideally we forgot. Ideally, it's final for then, as the final point, right, asking for feedback, finding that person that can get you that feedback that's so important to you. Finding what worked and moving forward.

21:21
That's right. All right. Do we have it for today?

21:25
I think that is it for today. Yeah. I had a lot of Thanks. Yeah, I had a blast. And thanks for meeting up. And we have a lot of good stuff coming up with Talaera. Right.

21:38
We have webinars, our blog is busier than ever. So go on the http://blog.talaera.com/, check out the resources. And what else?

21:51
Find us on LinkedIn. And yeah, please ask any questions, we'd be glad to get back to you. So that is it for today. And thank you to all of our listeners. So far, we're excited to keep growing this. And as always, keep learning!

22:11
And that's all we have for you today. We hope you enjoyed it, and remember to subscribe to Talaera Talks. We'll be back soon with more! And visit our website at https://talaera.com for more valuable content on business English. You can also request a free consultation on the best ways for you and your team to improve your communication skills. So have a great day and keep learning!

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